It’s Just Normal

On April 24th, 2020, Kings County, New York, surpassed Queens County, New York, with 4,344 deaths from Covid-19, making it the deadliest county in the US. That day, Brooklyn was home to nearly 10% of the entire country’s coronavirus deaths. In fact, of nearly 2.5% of all deaths in the world. With only three hundredths of one percent (0.03%) of the world’s population-that’s 833 times what it should be for that many people.

Scary as hell living in Brooklyn, the deadliest place on earth for Covid-19. For a few grim weeks.

We all know what happened in NYC—Lockdown. Essential workers…


It’s Just Normal

On April 24th, 2020, Kings County, New York, surpassed Queens County, New York, with 4,344 deaths from Covid-19, making it the deadliest county in the US. That day, Brooklyn was home to nearly 10% of the entire country’s coronavirus deaths. In fact, of nearly 2.5% of all deaths in the world. With only three hundredths of one percent (0.03%) of the world’s population-that’s 833 times what it should be for that many people.

Scary as hell living in Brooklyn, the deadliest place on earth for Covid-19. For a few grim weeks.

We all know what happened in NYC-Lockdown. Essential workers…


Seems like there is a surfeit† of speculative tv shows and books and movies and…

I don’t have the time to watch them. Read them. See them. Even listen to them.

Not in the least because I’m creating some of these. Just in the past couple of months:

  • Selection Ourselves-audiobook (edited the text, wrote introductory materials, voiced, mastered, and published it)
  • Rebuilt parts of my website-light web mastering and ongoing fixes for the AudioBook and Bio
  • Hammered out 16 chapters of The Book of Visions. (A mixture of editing and drafting. Just under 220 pages. As of Tuesday, May 25th.)

Enough of what I’ve been doing.

From the Department of Too Much to View, Read, Listen

From Thrillist, a collection of the Best SFF Movies of…


Got my first Mac in 1990. With that floppy slot in front. Never owned anything other than Mac. Well, Treo until iPhone.


Very True—Suffering before necessary is to suffer more than necessary. (Kind of a mindfulness thing, now that I think of it.)


My father once said that, in the Army, he learned that “Success is a lousy teacher.”
That aphorism has stuck with me for decades.
I’ve understood it in many different ways over the years. Usually as a variation on the theme that if you get things right, especially when trying something new out, it’s hard to know what you did to get it right, and worse, you’ve got no guidance about what to avoid.

It’s confusing. Makes repeating a successful try that much harder.

But when you fail, it’s usually easier to divine what you did wrong and make a…


When the world turns upside down in an instant, where do you go from there?

A Tale of Perseverance Part Two

This past year and a half have been rough on many levels, so I want to bring back a story of survival: ten years after 9–11 in NYC.

I wasn’t in any of the buildings that were struck. I was not one of the rescue workers. I don’t know anyone who was. But I did work only blocks from the World Trade Center.

The Day of the Attacks

On that September morning, the announcement in the subway that smoke had closed my usual exit, the Cortlandt Street station, didn’t bother me. Subway fires aren’t that unusual-just trash on the tracks.

Instead, I got off at…


A New Yorker looks at how his life and his city have changed a year after 9–11

(Adapted from, vol 26 The OHIO STATE Alumni Magazine, September 2002)

A year after 9–11, I think of it as “the Event.”

I worked only a six-minute walk from the World Trade Center. I watched the buildings burn, and later, in my office, felt them collapse with a deep, shuddering rumble. I walked three hours home to Brooklyn, dust clinging to the edges of my mouth, nose, and eyes.

For the two weeks, my office was closed, I holed up in my apartment, smelling the stink of burn, listening to fighter jets over the city, hearing sirens, and wondering if…


The Author as Assasin

“In writing, you must kill all your darlings.”

— William Faulkner

Yes, this post will be about wholesale slaughter.
Of words, characters, and ideas.
Of little darlings-all those great lines, tightly written paragraphs, wonderfully surprising sub-plots, or dashing characters that please the writer, but will bore, or worse, confuse the reader.
I’ve never enjoyed doing that, murdering words. My words. Words I’ve worked very hard to fashion into sentences, paragraphs, scenes-whatever-words I’ve breathed life into. Spent hours with, shaping them.
It’s never easy to realize something you’ve worked so hard on simply isn’t working. Or that…

W Lance Hunt

Award-winning short story author, novelist, and popular live reader

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